June Reading Wrap-Up

So, June was an excellent reading month. I highly recommend all five of these, though you’ll have to wait on a couple. It’ll be worth it. 🙂 

23310763The Anatomical Shape of a Heart by Jenn Bennett
1. Quirky characters — in the best possible way. Bex and Jack are vibrant and fun and artistic and compassionate; they jump off the page as dynamic, realistically flawed teenagers. And the chemistry they share? Whoa. I love them!
2. Sex positive. Author Jenn Bennett has this natural and authentic way of dealing with sexuality; this book boasts one of the most candid, awkward, and wonderful conversations about sex by two fictional teens that I’ve ever read.
3. Mental illness. Without giving too much away, there’s a character in The Anatomical Shape of a Heart who has been diagnosed with a serious mental illness. I was moved by the way this character was portrayed — as a person, not an affliction– and with the utmost sensitivity and regard. Jenn Bennett is a new favorite author of mine, and this is a remarkable book.

36146624You’d Be Mine by Erin Han (April 2, 2019)
1. Country music! It’s no secret that I’m a huge country music fan, and the way my favorite genre was incorporated into this debut is glorious. While the novel is about two fictional singers, real life greats are sprinkled throughout, making the story feel rich and authentic.
2. All the angst. If you’re looking for an intense push-and-pull romance that’ll give you all the feels without reading as contrived or manipulative, watch for You’d Be Mine next spring. Annie and Clay have to slay a million demons to be together, and I rooted for them so hard.
3. Atmosphere. Erin Hahn has a gift for dropping the reader right into a scene — whether it be a family moment at Annie’s grandparents’ farm, Clay’s quiet show in a local dive bar, or an extravagant performance in a packed arena under the heat of the setting sun. I finished this novel wanting to live in its pages.

36199084The Kiss Quotient by Helen Hoang
1. Hot, hot, hot. Friends,  this is not YA. There’s a lot of steaminess — like, a lot, and it’s explicitly described — but the intimate scenes MCs Stella and Michael share aren’t gratuitous; they drive the plot. Plus, they’re beautifully written and packed with emotion and, wow, I really love this book.
2. Neurodiversity. Stella is on the spectrum, and she believes she’s bad at relationships as a result. Her challenges with connections and social situations are a big part of the story, but they’re not the biggest part of Stella. She’s incredibly smart, thoughtful, generous, and funny. One of the most deftly drawn protagonists I’ve read in a long time.
3. A+ love interest. Michael has the sort of complicated backstory that gives him that damaged romantic hero vibe, but he also has a warm family and a sweetly protective nature, and he’s altruistic to a fault. He’s seriously the best.

28587957Small Great Things by Jodi Picoult
1. Timely and important. I had misgivings going into Small Great Things; I didn’t want to read a white woman’s take on what it’s like to be a black woman, nor did I want to be preached to. Fortunately, I found this novel to be a thoughtful, nuanced look at what it means to be an ally; it’s a necessary and powerful read considering current events.
2. Unflinching. Honestly, I had a hard time reading white supremacist Turk’s point-of-view chapters. His language and ideologies literally made me cringe, but at the same time, his character arc captivated me. What does it take to produce a person like him? Is someone with such deeply engrained racism capable of change? Of redemption?
3. Unputdownable. This one’s definitely a page-turner, and there are some twists that shocked me. Additionally, the character development is masterful, as has been the case with all of the Jodi Picoult books I’ve read.

40589911
No Place Like Here by Christina June (May 21, 2019)
1. Steep character arc. In the opening of this novel, MC Ashlyn reminded me of myself as a teenager: quiet, resigned, and stuck in my head. As the story progresses, though, she becomes a strong, take-charge girl who makes big decisions and takes risks. Teen readers will be able to relate to her, and I think they’ll love cheering her on.
2. Unique setting. Ashlyn’s summer job at a retreat center is really cool — it’s like camp, but for adults. There’s swimming and a dining hall and a ropes course, which leads to the cutest, most awkward zip-line rescue you ever did read.
3. Friendship focused. I like my YA romance centered, but I found No Place Like Here refreshing in its emphasis on friendship. I loved watching Ash’s relationship with her cousin, Hannah, blossom, and it was fun to see her get to know Baxter, master of the ropes course, in a deep but platonic way. My almost-eleven-year-old is a Christina June fan, and she’s already asking for this book.

What’s the best book you read in June?

Advertisements

6 responses to “June Reading Wrap-Up

  1. The best book I read in June was Strange the Dreamer by Laini Taylor! It was so beautiful!

  2. The cover of NO PLACE LIKE HERE is gorgeous! And thanks for the line about your daughter – she and my niece are about the same age so I’m always on the lookout for recommendations!

  3. I love Jenn Bennett! I recently read The Anatomical Shape of a Heart, but I also loved Bitter Spirts (ghosts!) and Starry Eyes (camping and swooning). I need to finish the rest of the Bitter Spirits series (the Roaring 20s, I think).

    The Kiss Quotient is easily one of my favorite books this year! I really enjoyed the relationship between the two, and the separate journeys they took together. He was so patient and kind, and she was determined to not be defined by her Asperger’s.

    The others are on my TBR.