December Reading Wrap-Up

Five books in December!
{As always, covers link to Goodreads pages.}

The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah –  This is the first Kristin Hannah novel I’ve read; it was selected by the book club I recently joined. I like historical fiction, and I’m a huge fan of books about strong women, so it’s no surprise I loved this one. It follows two sisters, Vianne and Isabelle, who are struggling to survive in WWII occupied France. Their challenges constantly test their strength, their morals, and the bond they share. This is a well-researched, hard-hitting story that is at times difficult to stomach, but I loved that about it — its unflinching portrayal of the toll war takes on unassuming towns and their citizens, particularly women. While reading, I frequently identified with different aspects of the sisters’ struggles, while at the same time feeling both awed and envious of their resilience. Pick this one up if you love accessible historical fiction, particularly stories about World War II.

Holding Up the Universe by Jennifer Niven – So. I’ve read many reviews of this contemporary YA romance since finishing the book myself, and several of those reviews call this story troublesome for various reasons, but mostly because of its representation as far as the two main characters: Libby, a girl who is overweight, and Jack, a boy who has a cognitive disorder. And, yes, I get it — I do. But, but, but this book is worth reading as a study in voice alone. Libby’s is excellent. Truly, truly excellent. In fact, I adored her all-around. Her spirit and her strength of character, her positivity, her humor, her bad-ass-ness (she legit socks Jack in the mouth at one point, which he totally deserves). Libby. Is. Awesome. If you’re considering picking up Holding Up the Universe, I’d encourage you to do so solely because its female protagonist is an utter delight, though please go in aware of potential representation issues.

Definitions of Indefinable Things by Whitney Taylor (April 4, 2017) – I loved everything about this forthcoming contemporary YA debut, but particularly main character Reggie. She’s so dry and funny and sharp (a defense mechanism, but still) and I couldn’t help but be absorbed into her weird and wonderful world. See, Reggie falls for a boy named Snake (yes), but Snake’s fathered the town princess’s soon-to-arrive baby, so complications quickly arise. Whitney Taylor does a fantastic job of portraying Reggie’s strengths and soft spots, as well as her ongoing battle with mental illness. She also pens believably complex parental relationships. If you like slightly offbeat contemps with delightfully flawed MCs, Definitions of Indefinable Things is one to watch for this April.

The Star-Touched Queen by Roshani Chokshi – Such a gorgeous cover, right? It’s indicative of this fantastical 2016 debut’s dreamy, atmospheric setting and elegant prose. The Star-Touched Queen reminds me of stories like Beauty & the Beast and Hades and Persephone (girl kept by a possibly volatile dude who may or may not have a heart of gold). From what I’ve read, this novel is based on Indian mythology, which is absolutely apparent in its details. Cursed main character Maya finds herself unexpectedly married to enigmatic Amar, ruler of Akaran, a world of secrets and mysteries and magic. While Amar lavishes Maya with love and affection, she’s not sure she can trust him or his motives, making their relationship fraught with tension and, sometimes, danger. Pick this one up if you like fantasy rich in setting and full of intense romance.

A World Without You by Beth Revis – Guess what? A World Without You is straight-up contemporary, which came as a big surprise to me (because Beth Revis). That said, lot of it reads more as spec-fic because Bo, the story’s protagonist, suffers from severe delusions. He believes he is a time-traveler attending a special school for teens with “powers.” As the novel opens, his girlfriend, Sofia, has just died, though Bo is convinced that she’s actually in 1600s Salem, where he accidentally left her. He is desperate to save her, and for the better part of the story, believes he is very close. Because A World Without You is told mostly from Bo’s 1st person POV, it seems as if we really are manipulating time along with him, an unsettling experience because we also know that Bo is seriously ill. A harrowing, hard-to-put-down novel that addresses mental disorders in a manner unlike any I’ve read before.

What’s the best book you read in December?

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